Real-Time Survival RPG ‘Will To Survive’ A Post-Apocalyptic Tamagotchi Of Sorts

Remember, a little over a decade ago, there were these little key-chain toys that everyone under the age of ten carried around called Tamagotchi pets? Those of us who obsessed over these toys for the six months they were all the rage (before those damned Furbys stole the spotlight) will remember the feeling of dread when it came time to set aside our 15-pixel monster child in order to go to school or soccer practice. How would our little blob survive without us? It could starve! It could die of a broken heart! It could be buried alive within its own poop-tomb! Oh the humanity!

Upcoming real-time survival RPG Will to Survive is planning on featuring a mechanic similar to what Tamagotchi caretakers experienced back in the late 90s: the game does not stop when players are not around. There is no pause, there is no second life…if Will (the metaphorically named protagonist) dies, the game restarts.

Before you critique the game for expecting you to sit in front of your PC all day (let’s just pretend that we don’t anyway) know that developer Alex Dawson plans to bring Will to Survive to as many platforms as possible, in order to let players check in on their survivor as frequently as possible. PC, Mac, Linux, OUYA, Android, iOS, and Windows Phone versions of Will to Survive will all sync to a cloud storage save, allowing players access on-the-go, on whatever platform they have handy. Dawson is also looking into Playstation Vita and GameStick support as well.

The game will force players to scavenge for supplies, and will provide an estimator that tells players about how long Will will be able to survive with the supplies at hand.

In the world of Will to Survive, aliens have invaded, and resources are scarce. Will is forced to venture deeper and deeper into dangerous territory to find supplies to continue his survival.

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Dawson recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for Will to Survive, which will run through the end of August.

“£20,000 may sound like a lot of money to some,” Dawson says on the Kickstarter page. “As well as going towards making sure that I can survive the year (no pun intended) the cash will also be going towards Kickstarter fees, software licenses for Xamarin and other crucial programs, taxes, server costs, possible code support, audio and fulfilling reward tiers for you lovely backer folk!”

Dawson has been working on Will to Survive between freelance contracts for over a year. He has been working on the game alone, coding and creating the art assets in his free time.

Visit the game’s official website, and follow the developer on Twitter.